slowly becoming a morning person
blackpowerisforblackmen:

Lupita was recently named the most beautiful by People’s Magazine, and some of their readers expressed their dissatisfaction with this decision  in the comment section. One reader even commented that Lupita didn’t deserve this title because she’s 100% black(she finds women unattractive if they’re 100% black). These comments made me think of the brilliant post made by radicalrebellion: 
White women (non-black women of color included in this as well) become offended and angry when a black woman (especially a dark skinned black woman like Lupita) is depicted as beautiful and worthy of appreciation because it jeopardizes their position as the epitome of beauty and womanhood. Black women are viewed as the antithesis of White beauty and womanhood, these white women are completely apathetic and silent when dark skinned Black women are portrayed as “ugly” and “unlovable” by the mainstream media because they benefit from this oppression. That’s why you never see white supermodels discussing racism and colorism in the fashion industry. However, these readers wouldn’t complain if it were light skinned black women like Halle Berry, Beyonce, or Rihanna (we all know why, hint: colorism). Anyway, congratulations to the ***flawless Lupita for being named the most beautiful!  
dear-science:

Graphic designer Annie Atkins from Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel on the many signs in the lobby of the of contemporary, communist-era form of the 1960s hotel:
"Wes and Adam (Stockhausen, the production designer) had seen so many examples of quite officious signage in what had been communist East Germany - don’t do this, don’t do that, do this but only like that! The signs really added to the claustrophobic feeling of that set, and Wes had asked for them all to be black with simple white hand-painted lettering - based on the style of the old sign at Yorckstrasse subway station in Berlin."
pinkfled:

Iggy Pop in Stockholm, Sweden - 1977

Y’s bis Limi Fall/Winter 2001
stlara:


moonburn | lily mcmenamy by rachel chandler for ssaw ss 14
poboh:


Woman with white tulips, André Brasilier. French born in 1929.
We’re so erased. …If you’re a person of color, if you’re a woman, if you’re from a poor family, if you’re from a rural family, if you’re from a family who worked like dogs and never got any respect or a share of the profits - you know that 99 percent of your stories ain’t been told. In any fucking medium.

And yet we still have to be taught to look, and to tell our stories. …Despite the utter absence of us, it’s still an internal revolution to say wait a minute, we are not only worthy of great art, but the source of great art.
written by Junot Diaz, in conversation with the New Yorker’s Hilton Als at The Strand, NYC 04-12-13 (via 100newfears)

(Source: pasunepomme, via arabellesicardi)